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Listen and learn: engaging young people, their families and schools in early intervention research
  1. Charlotte Connor1,2
  2. on behalf of Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West Midlands (CLAHRC-WM) Youth Mental Health
    1. 1Research Lead Youth Mental Health Theme Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West Midlands (CLAHRC-WM), University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    2. 2Research and Innovation Centre for Mental Health, The Barberry Centre, Birmingham, UK
    1. Correspondence to Dr Charlotte Connor, Research and Innovation Centre for Mental Health, The Barberry Centre, 25 Vincent Drive, Birmingham B15 2FG, UK; charlotte.connor{at}warwick.ac.uk

    Abstract

    Recent policy guidelines highlight the importance of increasing the identification of young people at risk of developing mental health problems in order to prevent their transition to long-term problems, avoid crisis and remove the need for care through specialist mental health services or hospitalisation. Early awareness of the often insidious behavioural and cognitive changes associated with deteriorating mental well-being, however, is difficult, but it is vital if young people, their families and those who work with them are to be fully equipped with the skills to aid early help-seeking. Our early intervention research continues to highlight the necessity of engaging with and listening to the voices of young people, families and those who work with children and young people, in developing greater understanding of why some young people may be more at risk in terms of their mental health, and to provide children and young people with the best mental health support we can. Collaborative working with young people, their families and those who work with them has been an essential dimension of our youth mental health research in Birmingham, UK, enabling us to listen to the personal narratives of those with lived experience and to work alongside them. This paper highlights some of our key studies and how we have endeavoured to make intra-agency working successful at each stage of the research process through increasing use of digital and youth-informed resources to engage young people: a methodology which continues to inform, guide and develop our early intervention research and implementation.

    This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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    Footnotes

    • Collaborators The Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West Midlands (CLAHRC-WM) Youth Mental Health theme: Professor Max Birchwood (University of Warwick), Professor Nick Freemantle (University College London), Professor Swaran Singh (University of Warwick), Dr Paul Patterson (Forward Thinking Birmingham, Birmingham Children's Hospital), Mr Colin Palmer (University of Warwick), Mrs Sunita Channa (University of Warwick), Dr Anna Lavis (University of Birmingham) and Dr Newman Leung (Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust).

    • Funding All research referred to in this paper were funded by the National Institute of Health Research as part of the CLAHRC-BBC (Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care—Birmingham and The Black Country) and CLAHRC-West Midlands. Charlotte Connor, Max Birchwood, Sunita Channa and Colin Palmer are all funded by CLAHRC West Midlands.

    • Disclaimer This paper presents independent research and the views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

    • Competing interests None declared.

    • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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