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The art of medicine: arts-based training in observation and mindfulness for fostering the empathic response in medical residents
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  • Published on:
    Cinema as a tool to increase empathy among medical residents
    • Daniel G. Di Luca, Neurology resident physician University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Neurology

    In the paper “The art of medicine: arts-based training in observation and mindfulness for fostering the empathic response in medical residents” Dr. Zazulak and colleagues address the role of an arts-based curriculum as an instrument to increase empathy and stimulate mindfulness and well-being in medical residents (1). I would like to extend the discussion and include cinema as a powerful tool able to not only provide a meaningful educational experience but also improve residents’ empathy and decrease exhaustion.
    Little has been studied and although reported in a few sporadic papers, there is no clear evidence that the use of arts can improve residents’ awareness and sensitivity (2-4). Regardless, there is a current trend of increased theoretical knowledge and objectivity among doctors suffering from a dogmatic approach that lacks empathy and emotion(5). As clearly defined by the authors in an era of increasing burnout among residents, films can not only educate and increase empathy but also serve as a social gathering as well as a way of having fun and relaxing(6). They not only offer an opportunity to face the meaning of being a doctor but also to arouse emotions yet hidden(5, 7). From a personal perspective I can be transported to a reality not clearly seen behind the desk and white coat and other perspectives now appear more tangible; I can see families suffering at home while taking care of their loved ones (Amour), the relation between nurses and paralyzed pati...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.